Bubbles

There are a lot reasons that we got involved in selling soapberries.  Some of them have nothing to do with cleaning things. Our main goal in forming any kind of business at all was the opportunity to provide a new source of income for folks who live in rural Honduras. 

A friend who was working with reforestation projects asked us to help him find a few samples of soapberry seeds.  One thing led to another and we discovered that the fruit of the soapberry is a really good natural soap and that the tree grows in  many regions of Honduras–in poor soil, where no other crops can be grown. Impressive, but we kept finding more reasons to pursue the idea of soapberries.

We had found a good product that could provide extra income for rural Hondurans, grow in poor soil, promote reforestation, is good for the environment, and can reduce water use. Especially compared to other environmentally friendly products, soapberries are economical.

Using a good product while helping people and helping the environment at a good price. What more could people ask for?

Well….. bubbles.

I like bubbles.  I can remember sitting on the outside step with my kids blowing bubbles and teaching them to wash dishes by playing in the bubbles in the sink. Bubbles are fun.  So, I understand when people say they would use soapberries if they just made more bubbles.  For a lot of people bubbles=cleaning power.

A certain amount of bubbles tells you that there is soap in the water because soap breaks surface tension. If you agitate water with soapberries you will make some bubbles. But a lot of  bubbles usually means glycerin or some other foaming agent. Glycerin makes great bubbles, but it is not a soap. Most commercial soaps make lots of bubbles, because bubbles sell.

So, while I understand the fascination of bubbles, it seems like the many, many reasons that make soapberries a good way to clean most anything that needs cleaning make giving up the bubbles a good trade-off. What do you think?

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